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Here you will find the replays of all of FIYAHCON’s permitted* replayable content. Miss a panel? Chances are you’ll find it here. We are still working through piles of video so do bear with us.

*”permitted” here means content for which we have secured replay permissions from our panelists. Under no circumstances are videos displayed here to be copied, shared, or have their links distributed outside of our website. Doing so is a violation of our Community and Privacy policies, and is forbidden without express written consent from all panelists involved.

"State Of" Panels

FIYAHCON State Of: Asian SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Asian writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Asian writers?
Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Diana Pho
Tasha Suri
Nibedita Sen
Yilin Wang
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Black SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Black writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Black writers?Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Arley Sorg
Tochi Onyebuchi
P. Djéli Clark
Chinelo Onwualu
Na’amen Gobert Tilahun
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Caribbean SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Caribbean writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Caribbean writers? Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Njelle Hamilton
Brandon O’Brien
Kaymara Barrett
Suzan Palumbo
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Indigenous SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Indigenous writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Indigenous writers? Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Kevin Wabaunsee
Erika T. Wurth
Lee Francis IV
Darcie Little Badger
Rebecca Roanhorse
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Latinx SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Latinx writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Latinx writers?
Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Daniel José Older
Christina Orlando
Mark Oshiro
Patty Nicole Johnson
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Māori + Pasifika SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Māori and Pasifika writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Māori and Pasifika writers? Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Cassie Hart
Sascha Stronach
Toni Wi
Sloane Leong
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON State Of: Muslim SFF

Marginalized peoples across publishing find themselves facing one institutional hurdle after another. What unique struggles do Muslim writers face trying to thrive and succeed in SFF spaces? From writing to conventions to publication, what strides have been made for Muslim writers?
Where are the areas of growth? What are you hopeful about?

Panelists:

Shannon Chakraborty
Sabaa Tahir
Sameem Siddiqui
Hafsah Faizal
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

Guests of Honor

FIYAHCON GOH Interview: Cassie Hart

Brent Lambert interviews FIYAHCON 2020 Guest of Honor Cassie Hart.
Cassie Hart (aka J.C. Hart and Nova Blake) is a Māori (Kāi Tahu, Makaawhio) speculative fiction writer who enjoys delving into human nature in all its beauty and disarray. Over the past five years she has published over ten novel and novellas, and has had her work printed in various anthologies including: A Foreign Country, Baby Teeth: Bite-sized Tales of Terror, Cthulhu: Land of the Long White Cloud, and Regeneration, as well as co-editing and contributing to the Sir Julius Vogel winning benefit anthology, Tales for Canterbury. In 2018 she was selected as one of six emerging Māori writers to participate in the Te Papa Tupu incubator programme, where she worked on her novel, Butcherbird, a supernatural suspense set under the watchful gaze of Mount Taranaki – which will be coming out from Huia in 2021. When she’s not raising her horde of wonderfully creepy children, or dreaming of the day she’ll have an army of ninja kittens, she’s writing, reading, or playing games.

FIYAHCON GOH Interview: Rebecca Roanhorse

Brent Lambert interviews FIYAHCON 2020 Guest of Honor Rebecca Roanhorse.
Rebecca Roanhorse is a New York Times Bestseller and Nebula, Hugo, and Locus Award-winning speculative fiction writer. Her novels include Trail of Lightning, Storm of Locusts (both part of the Sixth World series), Star Wars: Resistance Reborn, and the middle grade novel on the Rick Riordan Imprint, Race to the Sun. Her short fiction can be found in Apex Magazine, Uncanny, and various anthologies including New Suns and The Mythic Dream. She lives with her husband and daughter in Northern New Mexico and can be found on Twitter at @RoanhorseBex. Her latest novel is the epic Fantasy Black Sun, out now.
This panel was pre-recorded without live captions. Transcript currently in progress.

FIYAHCON GOH Interview: Yasser Bahjatt

Brent Lambert interviews FIYAHCON 2020 Guest of Honor Yasser Bahjatt.
Yasser is a technologist, futurist, serial entrepreneur, author, computer engineer and consultant.

He is the co-founder of Yatakahayloon (they are imagining), a company focused on cultivating SciFi across Arabia and raising it to the level where it can be globally competitive.
His novel “Yaqteenya: the old world” is the first Arabian alternative history, and he co-authored the English edition of HWJN, Somewhere and Binyameen that had been written in Arabic by his partner Ibraheem Abbas.

He is currently working on the movie adaptation of HWJN and previously chaired the bid to host Worldcon in Jeddah in 2026.

Fringe

FIYAHCON Fringe: Superheroes Around the World

Every culture has its superheroes, but their form function can vary dramatically under the spandex. Come hear our panel discuss superheroes as moral paragons, propaganda, agents of revisionist history like that time Spiderman used a giant robot to fight aliens.

Panelists:

Iori Kusano
Brandon O’Brien
Fran Wilde
Charles Tan

FIYAHCON Fringe: Writing in the West from Outside

Sometimes building a writing career in your own country isn’t feasible due to lack of markets, government censorship, other factors. However, working in the West has its own headaches: How do I navigate contracts across country lines? What visas can I get for events or foreign residencies? Do I really need an MFA? Authors will discuss what they find most challenging about publishing in Western markets what they wish they’d known starting out.

Panelists:

Sofia Rhei
Gabriela Lee
Yvette Lisa Ndlovu
Karin Tidbeck

FIYAHCON Fringe: Different, But the Same: Writing from the Diaspora vs. Writing Locally

Being in different places can vastly affect your perspective of any one issue, even if you share the same ethnicity as the other party. What would diaspora writers like sourcelanders to know? What would sourceland writers like the diaspora to know? What common misconceptions would both parties like to debunk? What challenges responsibilities are faced by both types? This panel counts the ways.

Panelists:

L Chan
Samit Basu
Zen Cho
Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki
Shingai Njeri

FIYAHCON Fringe: Should I Italicize That?

It’s the eternal struggle: why do we italicize takoyaki but not taco? What counts as a loanword? Do italics highlight distinctive aspects of cultures settings, or do they exoticize it? Should we italicize anything at all? Panelists will share how they approach this problem within their own work, including how to discuss it with editors agents.

Panelists:

Iori Kusano
Shiv Ramdas
Zen Cho
Yukimi Ogawa
Victor Fernando R. Ocampo

FIYAHCON Fringe: Re-Imagining Magic

A magic system needs limitations rules to function… or does it? Is magic a system, a force, or an entity? Can your magic solve problems, or does it only cause them? Authors on this panel will discuss how they handle magic within their own work as well as the overall role of magic within fantasy narratives.

Panelists:

Vida Cruz
Samit Basu
Jordan Ifueko
Emma Mieko Candon
Cassie Hart

FIYAHCON Fringe: On the Shoulders of Giants - Literary Parents

Many will cite Tolkien or other white male authors from the 1950s as influences. But these are literary parents, too: the ghost stories of your elementary school, the Halloween specials of a nightly news show, the tales your mother/grandmother/nanny told you before bed (often to scare you into being good). This panel will discuss their own literary parents from both within beyond the margins, as well as what they think count don’t when it comes to influences in their work.

Panelists:

Cassie Hart
Toni Wi
Samit Basu
Rafeeat Aliyu
Elaine Cuyegkeng

FIYAHCON Fringe: We Won't Phone It in for an Anglophone Audience

Have you ever had an editor tell you to rewrite something you wrote in a mix of English your native language just because it wasn’t “proper” English? Do you sometimes run into a wall when directly translating a word or phrase from your language for an anglophone audience when you feel like they can get it from context clues? This panel will talk about getting around the pitfalls for writing for an Anglophone audience—and perhaps give tips for how such an audience can approach their works.

Panelists:

Cristina Jurado
Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki
Haralambi Markov
Shingai Njeri
Brandon O’Brien

Weekend Panels

The Confederation of Aunties

Aunties with plates of food in one hand the other ready to smack some sense into you. They make up the backbone of many cultures, so why don’t we see more of them in spec fic? What would a novel with an Auntie MC look like? When does one become an Auntie?

Panelists:

Z Aung
Diana M. Pho
Veronica Henry
Jenn Lyons
Nibedita Sen

Writing to Market: BIPOC Writers Navigating Commercial Viability

Acquisition departments in publishing have the job of considering how profitable a work can be. BIPOC face more hurdles than other authors in trying to make their books stand out as profitable. What does that look like from an author agent standpoint? Is it something authors should worry about. This panel explores those concerns.

Panelists:

Arley Sorg
Tochi Onyebuchi
Patrice Caldwell
Ayana Gray
Terese Mason Pierre

Sci-Fi: Fix My World

The applications of evolving or soon-to-be developed technologies have the potential to create lasting change for our generation many more to come. Science fiction has a unique ability to inspire the masses in supporting, fighting for, or simply believing reform is possible.

The panel discussion will focus on established works that tackle reform of the prison industrial complex, climate change, corporate politics other untapped topics.

Panelists:

Arula Ratnakar
S. B. Divya
Sameem Siddiqui
Patty Nicole Johnson
Allan Dyen-Shapiro

Brave New World: Manifesting Utopian Elements of SFF in the Real World

Sometimes when we write, we create better worlds than our own. From garden cities and unique governing structures, to flourishing barter economies and the fulfillment of Land Back movements, this panel discusses systems and characteristics featured in speculative fiction and ways we might go about making them a reality.

Panelists:

Toni Wi
Charlie Jane Anders
Kevin Wabaunsee
M. Haynes
Georgina Kamsika

Self-pub to Trad-pub to Self-pub

Pursuing a hybrid publishing model? Here’s what you need to know about what to expect from switching processes.

Panelists:

Ashia Monet
L.M. Davis
HD Hunter
Nicole Givens Kurtz
Eliana González Ugarte

New Magic: Roots in Diaspora

Traditional publishing’s “diversity” requirements often force writers of color to source their magic cultural systems from “motherlands” or foreign roots of origin to be considered “authentic”. This panel explores the beauty magic systems authentic to peoples of diaspora origins.

Panelists:

Christopher Caldwell
Justin C. Key
Swati Teerdhala
Breanne Mc Ivor

Publishing in Spec 101

Just starting on your SFF publishing journey? Here’s everything you need to know about how this thing works.

Panelists:

K. Tempest Bradford
Matt Belford
Christopher Caldwell
J.R.H. Lawless
Na’amen Gobert Tilahun

Speculative Fiction is Global

Speculative fiction perspective can often stagnate around US and UK conferences and publishers, but SF is truly global, with rapidly expanding genre reading markets across the world. Come and learn more about SF from places outside of the industry’s usual gaze.

Panelists:

Gautam Bhatia
Eugen Bacon
Uche Ogbuji
Yasser Bahjatt
Katalina Watt

Editing Through a BIPOC Lens

Self-rejection is a problem that plagues BIPOC writers because they often run into editors that continuously do not understand their work. How can BIPOC editors make the difference for BIPOC writers? What considerations do BIPOC editors have to make that white editors don’t? How can the larger SFF community help to uplift these editors?

Panelists:

Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali
Diana M. Pho
Troy Wiggins
Pablo Defendini
Chimedum Ohaegbu

Yes, Representation is Actually Fun

Often discussions around diversity happen with a lot of gravitas applied. these are certainly serious discussions, but representative media is also a gateway to much more fun stories. In what current ways is that the case? How can writers try to see diversity as a skillful asset not just a quick checklist?

Panelists:

Naseem Jamnia
Illimani Ferreira
Namina Forna
Sean Dowie
Christina Orlando

The Role of the Critic

It is almost obvious that as media strives to include more voices–writers of color, disabled writers, queer writers in the broadest sense — that the entire pipeline must be as diverse to support them, from creator to critic. This panel would explore this idea, that a writer/creative exists in an ecosystem of support that includes vibrant, diverse critique from people within with-out of their community. The internet seems to make this easy, anyone can express their opinion, so how do professional (or semi-professional) organizations produce useful critique? How does it differ based on media? What’s the place of a review website or blog in the publishing environment? Is it getting better? Worse? Growing? Changing? Where has it been where is it going?

Panelists:

Leslie Light
Sean Dowie
Alex Brown
Njeri (Onyx Pages)
Chloe (Thistle + Verse)

Untapped Potential in Worldbuilding/Inspiration for East Asian Spec Fic

The history current social/demographic layout of East Asia is vastly unknown to average laypeople. East Asia, as it exists in the Western imagination, is largely influenced from anime, Kung Fu movies, commercialized tourist media. As a result, stories with East Asian characters, use East Asian elements or set in East Asian worlds are often pigeon-holed into trite descriptors: martial arts, wearing kimono, set in imperial palaces, involving Asian dragons, speaking Cantonese/Mandarin but nothing else, etc.

Panelists:

SL Huang
Andrew K Hoe
RF Kuang
Andrea Stewart

Querying with Color

Panelists talk about traditional publishing’s query and submission process through the lens of cultural marginalization

Panelists:

B. Sharise Moore
N.E. Davenport
Namina Forna
Naseem Jamnia

Finances in Publishing: Why it Matters

If you’re hoping to make money from your writing or if you already are, then you might want to know how to manage it. This panel discusses how money should always flow to the writer and what that looks like whether it be advances or royalties. It’ll discuss predatory practices you should beware of and what practical advice you need to consider when earning income as an author.

Panelists:

DongWon Song
Matt Belford
J.R.H. Lawless
Patrice Caldwell
Michael Underwood

Usurping Lovecraft

Lovecraft is an unequivocal racist. But his legacy influences challenges BIPOC writers till this day. With the smash hit Lovecraft Country making a pop culture splash, how will BIPOC writers continue to challenge inspect Lovecraft’s legacy? How will they elevate it?

Panelists:

Daniel Jose Older
P. Djeli Clark
Eden Royce
K. Tempest Bradford
Alicia McCalla

Reading as Networking: Building Community by Engaging Work

Writing can be a solitary act, but all writers need community for both creative and business purposes. Reading is perhaps the easiest way to connect with authors. This panel explores how talking about stories can be the vehicle for a writer to build a genuine creative network.

Panelists:

Adri
Noria
Charles Payseur
Mark Oshiro
Kwame Mbalia

What Makes a Great Book Cover

You may not be able to judge a book by its cover but your wallet certainly can. What makes a great book cover? What does it need to do to draw a reader’s attention? And how do book covers sometimes work in favor of and against BIPOC creatives?

Panelists:

Suzan Palumbo
John Picacio
Likhain
C.L. Clark
Ashia Monet

Exploring the World and Worldbuilding

Traveling is by no means necessary to be a powerful fantasy writer, but seeing the world certainly can’t hurt to inspire creativity. How can travel be an item in the writer’s toolbox? How should a writer approach travel as a source of inspiration without being appropriative? What are the best parts about connecting exploring the world to writing?

Panelists:

Chinelo Onwualu
P. Djeli Clark
Nicole Glover
Ryan Van Loan
Regine L. Sawyer

AAVE, Pidgin, and the Global Patois

Panelists discuss regional dialects and their proper execution in fiction. How do you display it authentically and still meet the needs of publishing? Should the needs of publishing even be a concern?

Panelists:

Shingai Njeri
Christopher Caldwell
Eden Royce
Shiv Ramdas

Mothers and Daughters: The Good, the Bad and the Strange

Mother and daughter relationships are simultaneously universal and unique. Let’s explore the tropes and innovations of how this relationship is portrayed across the genre (i.e. books, TV, film). Explore the works of Octavia Butler, Shirley Jackson, Jennifer Phang, and many others.

Panelists:

Michele Tracy Berger
Maria Haskins
LL McKinney
Alexis Henderson

The Art of Self-Promotion

Whether independent or traditionally publishing, there’s an art to effective self-promotion. This panel covers the do’s, don’t’s, how’s of talking about your own work.

Panelists:

Shiv Ramdas
Martin Cahill
Russell A Smith
Suzanne Walker
Natasha D. Lane

Em-Dash: A Gameshow for Writers

Part “Chopped,” part writing sprint, join us as four contestants compete to write a piece of flash fiction using four random ingredients, winning a prize we have yet to figure out but will probably be amazing.

Panelists:

Martin Cahill
Shiv Ramdas
Ashia Monet
Mark Oshiro

FIYAHCON Closing Ceremonies

The closing ceremonies retrospective with the ConCom.

Panelists:

L.D. Lewis
Jen Brown
Brent Lambert
Eddie Louise
Danny Lore
Suzan Palumbo
Mary Sue Renfrow
Eboni Dunbar
Coral Moore

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