Attendee/Archive

Welcome to FIYAHCON 2021

2021 Archives

Here you will find the replays of all of FIYAHCON’s permitted* replayable content. Miss a panel? Chances are you’ll find it here. We are still working through piles of video so do bear with us.

*”permitted” here means content for which we have secured replay permissions from our panelists. Under no circumstances are videos displayed here to be copied, shared, or have their links distributed outside of our website. Doing so is a violation of our Community and Privacy policies, and is forbidden without express written consent from all panelists involved.

How To Use

Tap the title of the item you’d like to watch and it will expand, revealing the playback video, panel description, and names of the panelists. Tap the video to begin playing. Additional viewing options will be made available once the video begins playing, including a toggle to full screen, playback definition, and closed captions.

FRIDAY ARCHIVE

There have been many cries for Justice in the world, so what would Justice actually look like in a working society i.e. how would a just society function? From a Macro (society) and Micro (personal) perspective, how would people live from day to day a world where justice is the prevailing societal construction. This is an SF/F worldbuilding question as well as a philosophical one. Let’s sit down and really imagine a world were Justice lives.

PANELISTS

Zin E. Rocklyn, Brittney M. Morris, Cadwell Turnbull, Bethany C. Morrow

Inspired by Shiv Ramdas’ 2020 Essay “Supernatural or Super Unnatural- An Examination of Postcolonial Horror,” authors from formerly occupied territories examine the ways in which colonization and implications of a post-colonial heritage act as lynchpins of horror, consequently bringing into sharp relief “the difference between the literature of the colonizer and the colonized.”

PANELISTS

Uche Ogbuji, Felicia Martinez, Zin E. Rocklyn, Nibedita Sen, Trang Thanh Tran

Morally grey characters, anti-heroes, and just your generally messy character seems to evoke a wide range of responses in today’s media. Why do we love these characters? What about them makes us bristle? Do either of these reactions say anything about the individual consuming the material?

PANELISTS

Zoraida Córdova, Sarah Mughal, Kiki Nguyen, Craig Laurance Gidney, Circe Moskowitz, Vita Ayala

Traditional Southern Gothic evokes settings of decayed grandeur, the grotesque in physical form and in character actions, ingenue fragility, and othering people. Modern Southern Gothic, as interpreted by our panelists, embraces horror and Black-American folk magic traditions while presenting us with diverse experiences of Southern Gothic.

PANELISTS

Veronica G. Henry, Sheree Renée Thomas, Karen Strong, Eden Royce

 

Guest of Honor Njeri speaks.

 

PANELISTS

Njeri @ ONYX Pages

LP Kindred

Guest of Honor Vita Ayala speaks.

PANELISTS

Vita Ayala

Danny Lore

 

Worldbuilding can be fun, but full of pitfalls when done carelessly especially in secondary worlds. Politics are embedded in every aspect of our lives so how does one go about crafting such political systems in their fiction? What considerations have to be made? Does creating an interesting world mean sometimes losing accuracy? These authors discuss how they build politics into their worlds and what advice they have for authors approaching a similar endeavor.

PANELISTS

Aurelius Raines II, Roseanne Brown, George Jrejie, C.L. Polk, K.S. Villoso, Scott King

From X-Men to Dragon Age, many marginalized groups in fantasy and science fiction are depicted as having powers that distinguish them from “normal” members of their respective societies. Fans and creatives discuss how these characters and stories can be empowering or problematic.

PANELISTS

Valerie Valdes, Darcie Little Badger, Tanya DePass, Sloane Leong, L.L. McKinney, Evan Narcisse

Magical Realism is a term unique to the Latine community and this panel will be an examination of the term in a post-colonial Latine context. Has its meaning stayed the same? Has it evolved?

PANELISTS

Linda Raquel Nieves Pérez, Kiara Valdez, Alex Temblador, Anna-Marie McLemore, Ann Dávila Cardinal

If Twilight and Vampire Diaries were any indication, vampires are dominant folklore throughout Western civilization. But there are blood-suckers and life-stealers throughout folklore worldwide. From the Adze in southern Africa to soucouyants of Trinidad to the aswang of the Philippines, how do these stories speak in diverse mouths and walk on darker islands and continents?

PANELISTS

Rin Chupeco, Giselle Liza Anatol, Isabel Cañas, Sydney Paige Guerrero, Kristina Palmer

A panel of emerging writers (who have been published in FIYAH, and a discussion on the importance of Black-centered literary platforms in nurturing the careers of up & coming writers, why we submitted to FIYAH, how we worked with FIYAH editors, building a portfolio, etc.

PANELISTS

Kel Coleman, WC Dunlap, Osahon Ize-Iyamu, LP Kindred

This panel will be exploring gender and body autonomy in a historically masculine coded sub-genre.

PANELISTS

Arune Singh, Zoe Hana Mikuta, Kat Overland, Caroline Tung Richmond, Andrea Tang, Marguerite Kenner

What would the world look like if its many buildings, modes of transportation, furniture, tools, and so much more were designed to accommodate people with different brains, bodies, and abilities? What would that world look like if it also had magic or futuristic technology or both? And what are the societal and cultural implications of such a world?

PANELISTS

Arula Ratnakar, Emma Candon, Day Al-Mohamed, Tochi Onyebuchi, Andi Buchanan


An all-star panel of creators discuss how they each leverage their unique experience to enhance IP properties and create better representation.

PANELISTS

Sheree Renée Thomas, Kat Overland, Linda D. Addison, Vita Ayala

 

Fear is not something we’re born with; it’s taught to us or acquired through experience. When your culture and your experience is different from the “mainstream,” how does that change your fears? Join our panelists for a thought-provoking discussion.

PANELISTS

Clara Madrigano, Usman Malik, Suzan Palumbo, Indrapramit Das, Cassie Hart

SATURDAY ARCHIVE

Awards in SFF have been nothing short of disappointing for a while now. Between insensitive hosts, botched names, adherence to white cultural norms and a purely Western focus it’s hard to see the value in them. But is there value? Can it be fixed? And what might those solutions look like?

PANELISTS

stitch, Sean Dowie, Christopher Caldwell, Cassie Hart, Arley Sorg, Suzan Palumbo

A book is a baby you need to present to the world that is already filled will milions of babies. How do you find your readers? Let’s talk about Kickstarters, PR firms, paid and free strategies you can use to publicize your books.

PANELISTS

R.S.A. Garcia, JF Garrard, Jesse Morales-Small, Sloane Leong

Story collections are often a great glimpse into an author’s or magazine’s brand of storytelling. But how do editor’s decide what stories to put into a collection? Is there a ratio between previously published and new works? How much of a role do publishers play in the story selection? These industry professionals discuss their own journeys in creating their collections.

PANELISTS

Kwame Mbalia, Matthew David Goodwin, Terese Mason Pierre, g. haron davis, Arley Sorg

Linguistics and language reclamation through SFF. These wordsmiths will take you on a journey and discuss how they reject the idea of a “standard/acceptable” voice.

PANELISTS

P. Djèlí Clark, Zen Cho, Daniel Jose Odler, Eden Royce, Sydnee Thompson, Jennifer Rhorer

Folklore is a system of practices, arts, and beliefs among a community. Historically, folklore has had a powerful role in preserving cultural identity in the face of imperialism, colonialism, and oppression. With that in mind, this panel will consider questions like: what’s the role of folklore as resistance in decolonial myth-building, and how do writers approach this idea? What are ways in which mythology and folklore can be anti-colonial, and what are some examples?  Is there a problem in writing down even a constructed folklore system when a core value of folklore is that it is organic, evolving, and usually oral? What happens when folklore is adopted (or co-opted) by nationalist interests? What are useful frameworks to understand folklore in fiction through an anti-colonial lens?

PANELISTS

Miyuki Jane Pinckard, Kat Cho, Maria Dong, Daphne Lee, Sonia Sulaiman, Breanne Mc Ivor

In spite of what some may say, many professional writers came up in fandom and wrote fanfiction– and some still do to this day. What skills have they taken from this experience? In what ways do fanfiction and original work differ from one another? Is working on licensed work just like writing fic?

PANELISTS

Jordan Ifueko, Danny Lore, C.L. Polk, Stitch, Brent Lambert

 

Today’s modern creative industry almost has multitasking built into it as a pre-requisitie. These creatives discuss how they juggle multiple projects, what do they do to make sure rest is part of the equation and what lessons they’ve learned along the way about structuring how their time is best spent. Our panelists come from multiple media formats so there’s sure to be something for everyone.

PANELISTS

Justin C. Key, Mike Chen, Jenee Darden, Marika Bailey, N.E. Davenport

 

Folklore is a system of practices, arts, and beliefs among a community. Historically, folklore has had a powerful role in preserving cultural identity in the face of imperialism, colonialism, and oppression. With that in mind, this panel will consider questions like: what’s the role of folklore as resistance in decolonial myth-building, and how do writers approach this idea? What are ways in which mythology and folklore can be anti-colonial, and what are some examples?  Is there a problem in writing down even a constructed folklore system when a core value of folklore is that it is organic, evolving, and usually oral? What happens when folklore is adopted (or co-opted) by nationalist interests? What are useful frameworks to understand folklore in fiction through an anti-colonial lens?

PANELISTS

Miyuki Jane Pinckard, Kat Cho, Maria Dong, Daphne Lee, Sonia Sulaiman, Breanne Mc Ivor

Drawing on Ibi Zoboi’s 2016 essay “Give Us Back Our Fucking Gods,” these panelists examine the emerging godpunk canon, tackling questions such as: “What does this reclamation look like? How does godpunk it look like in a genre obsessed with “white men and their fucking gods?” and importantly, what does it look like for marginalized communities.”

PANELISTS

Jamar Perry, Deborah Falaye, Van Hoang, R. F. Kuang, Kwame Mbalia, Scott King

From nondescript protein slush to lavish 3D-printed meals, the way our characters eat establishes both their personalities and the worlds around them. Join our panelists as they discuss some of their favorite fictional foods, cutting-edge culinary technology, innovations they’ve incorporated into their writing, and more!

PANELISTS

Rafeeat Aliyu, Lavanya Lakshminarayan, Eugenia Triantafyllou, Jeannette Ng, Prof. Katherine Denby

Although the Gregorian calendar has become the accepted standard in international communication, many cultures still use their traditional calendars, and inventing your own can be a great way to flesh out the world of your story. Our authors discuss the calendars they live by and how they tell time in fiction.

PANELISTS

Mazi Nwonwu, Iori Kusano, Junelie Velonta, Shweta Adhyam, Victor Ocampo

From Dracula to Mothman, every monster has their own appeal! This panel unpacks the metaphors bundled into the concept of monstrosity and shows us why we love monsters so much if they were meant to be hated—and maybe even discusses for us what is well and truly monstrous if not the monsters.

PANELISTS

Sara Saab, Neon Yang, Haralambi Markov, Teodor Reljic, Joel Donato Ching Jacob

Unfortunately, publishing is an industry where many of the basics are kept secret or just aren’t readily shared. Social media has been huge in illuminating a lot of processes for newer writers, but there’s still a ways to go. What roles can more experienced writers play as mentors in demystifiying the industry? What is the best way to leverage your own successes as an author to help others?

PANELISTS

Jaymee Goh, Tobias Buckell, Mary Anne Mohanraj, Claribel A. Ortega

An examination of queer desire in genre fiction, when and how it’s allowed to happen, how it’s depicted, why do we yearn and why do we f*ck, etc?

PANELISTS

Bendi Barrett, C.L. Clark, Naomi day, Victor Manibo, Cecilia Tan

In this panel, we will discuss the ways in which the Black librarian experience mirrors the experience of publishing Black YA SFF/H in a majority white publishing industry. This conversation will look to examine the ways in which both breach the traditional cannon by infiltrating a space that was not traditionally designed for them and carving out space to build new empires.

PANELISTS

Dr. Stephanie Renee Toliver, Alex Brown, Anastacia Collins, Brea McQueen, Renee Tecco, Eboni Dunbar

The conversation on Palestine has often been largely defined by outside voices reshaping the past in order to legitimize the destruction of the Palestinian present and future. Despite this, Palestinians continue to write their own futures and fantasies in bold ways, carving out space to redefine the narrative of their own identities. Join our panelists as they discuss Palestinian Futurism and the importance of speculative fiction in the role of exploring the realm of the Palestinian imaginary.

PANELISTS

Iasmin Omar Ata, Leena Aboutaleb, Fargo Nissim Tbakhi, N.A. Mansour, Nadia Shammas

Who’s in charge of your world? Why are they there? How did they obtain that power and at whose expense? And what does it mean to be “in charge” anyway, especially if someone else is pulling the strings? All these questions and more will be dealt with in this panel.

PANELISTS

Rivers Solomon, Yudhanjaya Wijeratne, Gautam Bhatia, Terese Mason Pierre, Samit Basu

Whether your box gets helds up in customs or a publisher won’t ship to your country or a DRM ebook isn’t available in your region, reviewing books can be a real pain when you live in the Global South. Meanwhile, writers from the Global South also face difficulty getting their books reviewed! A selection of authors and reviewers discuss these problems.

PANELISTS

Kaymara Barrett, Kate Heceta, Gautam Bhatia, Fadi Zaghmout, Samit Basu

Representations of Blackness in genre fiction have been a topic the publishing industry has had to confront again and again, but epic fantasy seems to have mostly avoided very necessary critiques. Especially when the intersections of Blackness are considered. But as more books are released with Black authors, is an inevitable reckoning on the horizon? These authors discuss that and also what they hope to bring to the genre.

PANELISTS

C. L. Polk, Eboni J. Dunbar, Christopher Caldwell, Jesse Morales-Smalls, C. L. Clark

Is it hot in here or is this panel definitely NSFW? There are many infamous examples of bad (published!) smut, and yet we hardly celebrate the good smut or talk about how to write it. These authors are here to tell you how to stop giggling long enough to write that first sentence, how to get the scene going without resorting to unfortunate euphemisms for anatomy or bodily functions, and how to tell if you need to write such an explicit scene anyway. Come for the plot, stay for the smut!

PANELISTS

Gayathri Kamath, Phoenix Alexander, Cecilia Tan, Mia Tsai, Cassie Hart

Do you think Tolkien realized the racist implications of the inter-cultural dynamics of Middle Earth? Does it make you shudder when there is no gravitas to a body count, even when it’s “just” elves and dwarves offing each other? Are you tired of “evil” and “primitive” races being coded as people of color? Well, so are these authors. Join them as they discuss common colonialism-tinged fantasy tropes and ways to break them. Can we, in fact, break away from colonialism in fantasy altogether?

PANELISTS

Aliette de Bodard, Tobi Ogundiran, Yasmin Portales-Machado, Zen Cho, Kate Heceta

Speculative fiction writers deal with the magical all the time when we make our own systems and worlds. But when it comes to using real-world magical practices—from the tarot to Vodoun to agimat crafting and beyond—few actually understand how they work, leading to embarrassing mistakes in fiction. This panel of authors will discuss real-world magic from different cultures, which may yield insight in creating fictional magic.

PANELISTS

Victor Ocampo, Z Aung, Cassie Hart, Dilman Dila, Iori Kusano

Fiction dealing with climate change has always been popular, but as the most pressing issue of our times evolves, our vision of how climate change affects or threatens us has also changed. Join our panelists as they discuss climate change in real life and in fiction: the scenarios we’ve examined or discarded, the dangers we face, and how we write about and around these problems.

PANELISTS

Sigrid Gayangos, Alexander Popov, Yudhanjaya Wijeratne, Amin Chehelnabi, Dilman Dila

SUNDAY ARCHIVE

Whose jurisdiction is this planet under, anyway? What permits do I need to park my spaceship here? And maybe taking a pound of flesh from my enemy is legal, but is it just? This panel discusses the gaps between law and justice and the complexity of legal and bureaucratic systems in genre fiction.

PANELISTS

L Chan, Mickey Ingles, Gautam Bhatia, Shiv Ramdas

First Contact Stories from a dominant perspective are often underpinned by “othering” and colonialist ideals as thinly-veiled representations of a human culture foreign to the author. But what do first contact stories look like when the historically “othered” control the narrative? Together these authors flip the script and parse visions of first contact.

PANELISTS

Tobi Ogundiran, Raquel Vasquez Gilliland, Sloane Leong, Tochi Onyebuchi, Lilliam Rivera

In 2018, BookRiot argued that grief in kidlit falls in four main schools: either the Rowling, Riordan, Lewis or Tolkien model. However, grief and mourning within Communities of Colour focus on homegoming and celebrating life. These Kidlit authors discuss loss and grief from the eyes of young folk, and how to better serve them in narratives that center death. And maybe, they’ll give us a new canon through which to process youth grief.

PANELISTS

Shingai Njeri Kagunda, Tara Sim, Kalynn Bayron, Shakirah Bourne, Ayana Gray, Hugh “H.D.” Hunter

Traditional publishing is often seen as the most common way of publishing, but over time, there are other methods: self-publishing, serial publishing, hybrid publishing, etc. This panel will explore different methods of publishing because sometimes getting an agent or traditional publisher may not be possible if the book is considered “too niche” or “unmarketable”.

PANELISTS

J. F. Garrard, Idris Grey, Auden Johnson, Natasha D. Lane, Chinelo Onwualu

What does it take to pull together an anthology in five months? These Bewitching Bonds was the first anthology out of Black Girls Create, showcasing writers of fiction, poetry, and visual artists all through the theme of magic and community. Join the editors and contributors to the anthology as they discuss writing, the process of creating the anthology, and how they connect to the themes of magic and community.

PANELISTS

Robyn-Renée Jordan, Monique Steele, Constance Gibbs, Jacque Aye

How do authors writing in non western traditions subvert the tenants of a genre that has cast them as the villains to explore their own stories of fear, dread, mystery and corruption? Who becomes the “other” or “doppelganger” in a story written by the feared “doppelgangers” themselves? This panel will explore how BIPOC writers have redefined Gothic literature and centered themselves in a genre is deeply grounded in the concept of white supremacy.

PANELISTS

IfeOluwa Nihinlola, Suzan Palumbo, Tobi Ogundiran, Rin Chupeco, Alexis Henderson, Lauren Blackwood

 

Agnes Gomillion’s The Record Keeper, C.L. Clark’s The Unbroken, and Kacen Callender’s Queen of the Conquered all feature intermediate class characters from colonized areas who are tasked to use their authority to repress the rebellion of their peers. Over the course of the story, these characters grapple with their ideals and if aligning with the colonizers or the colonized is more in their self interest. We discuss maintaining reader interest in Rabblerousers.

PANELISTS

Chloe (Thistle & Verse), Tanaz Bhathena, C.L. Clark, Destiny Soria, Andrea Stewart, Tasha Suri

You know their names (and their stories) now it’s time to dissect what makes them “special?” Together, these writers dissect the archetype of “the chosen one,” {ancient} prophecies, the heroes journey and how to make space for characters who “aren’t like the others.”

PANELISTS

Destiny Soria, Kelly Andrew, Vita Ayala, Vajra Chandrasekera, L.L. McKinney, Sarah Raughley

America and Science Fiction have a history of medical racism and eugenicist rhetoric that dovetail to fuel BIPOC nightmares. This panel reckons with body horror, both in real hospitals and fictional laboratories, to help us understand the ramifications and future of our bodies as autonomous. Or not?

PANELISTS

Diana M. Pho, P. Djeli Clark, Donyae Coles, Justin C. Key, Usman Malik, Scott King (V. Host)

Together this group of authors discuss the ways climate change influences their work. Special emphasis will be on setting and worldbuilding with an overarching theme of climate change as more than dystopia as a grounding element of their work.

PANELISTS

Selena Middleton, Omar El Akkad, Malka Older, Waubgeshig Rice, Marguerite Kenner

Cyberpunk was once a term meant to evoke revolution and fighting against the system. But recent discussions have seen that term re-examined and looked at through appropriate lenses of xenophobia, colonialism and racism. So is there still room for the subgenre in today’s world? These authors discuss how cyberpunk can serve our current moment.

PANELISTS

S. Qiouyi Lu, Olivia Chadha, Andrea Kriz, Malka Older, Kola Heyward-Rotimi

Often times, publishing creates futures that include EITHER computers/AI or marginalized people. In the present day, we battle algorithms that either erase us or target us. But what do the worlds that WE imagine do to confront technology and our own humanity?

PANELISTS

Malka Older, S. B. Divya, Arula Ratnakar, Sascha Stronach, Yudhanjaya Wijeratne, Katie Zhao

The Gilded Age: An era of freedom, change and speakeasies. But where are all the BIPOC? The resurgence of Jazz Age fantasy begs the question of why now and why us? From secondary worlds where the Jazz Age is a backdrop for vibrant worlds where memories, love and new beginnings take the stage to godpunk sagas of revenge, feminism, freedom and political movements, these writers examine how we center BIPOC living it up and living their everyday lives.

PANELISTS

Alex Brown, Premee Mohamed, Leslye Penelope, Chloe Gong, Anna-Marie McLemore

Guest of Honor Malka Older speaks.

PANELISTS

Malka Older, Brent Lambert

An exploration of legal systems in speculative fiction with subject matter experts and authors, to examine the choices and consequences behind legal systems, and provide the tools for making conscious choices in legal worldbuilding.

PANELISTS

Karintha Parker, Marguerite Kenner, Njeri @ ONYX Pages, Sameem Siddiqui

SFF, as a genre, loves grand libraries. We’re here to examine the ways knowledge is archived and categorized in different stories, from “paperless” sci-fi futures to racks of scrolls lining the castle walls. We may even discuss how literature is shaped by the medium it comes in (bamboo flute poetry, anyone?) and what that means for our stories.

PANELISTS

Phoenix Alexander, Subodhana Wijeyeratne, Aliette de Bodard, Tendai Huchu

Space: the final frontier—and it’s every bit as problematic as the other frontiers were! Whether it’s military imperialism or cultural imperialism, science fiction is rife with expansionism, conquest narratives, and violent subjugation of the Other. Our panel unpacks some of this baggage and envisions a more peaceful way forward (or do we just burn it all down and start anew?).

PANELISTS

Manish Melwani, L Chan, Subodhana Wijeyeratne, Fabio Fernandes, Mark Galarrita

It’s hard being neurodiverse, and BIPOC are consistently underdiagnosed and undertreated. We’re “acting out” or “not trying hard enough,” our struggles erased by unsympathetic societies. In this panel, our authors talk about how they work with and around their brains when writing, editing, and submitting, and whether and how they choose to reflect their neurodiversity in their work.

PANELISTS

Gayathri Kamath, Allison Thai, Haralambi Markov, Stefani Tran, Day Al-Mohamed

Sensitivity reading is a valuable job in the publishing industry, but it’s frequently misunderstood. Our panel of sensitivity readers discuss how to handle an author who wants you to give them a “pass,” how to combat the idea that you speak for everyone who shares your marginalization, and the struggle of how best to frame a critique of racist material.

PANELISTS

Stef Tran, Yvonne Lin, Terese Mason Pierre, Idris Grey, Iori Kusano

The FIYAHCON Team say goodbye and goodnight and discuss the future of FIYAHCON.

PANELISTS

LD Lewis, Iori Kusano, Brent Lambert, Suzan Palumbo, Danny Lore

Set Layout